Last chance saloon

At the last general election in 2015 Britons got to choose which of the two major parties would administer austerity. In the snap election on June 8 they are expected to endorse smash and grab capitalism, intensified class war, devastation of the Global South, support for US imperialism and the launch of nuclear missiles on a ‘first-strike’ basis. Democracy in the west is now a template for extinction by consent. Continue reading

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The personal is political

Baroness Chakrabarti – the British human rights activist who joined the Labour Party last year and is now shadow attorney general – claims “austerity is a feminist issue.” Henceforth women, disproportionately punished by cuts in social spending, must press for ‘gender neutral’ government budgets.  Regrettably, throwing a hijab over the class struggle is unlikely to end exploitation. Continue reading

Take it to the limit

It’s been fashionable for the smart and smug to dump on Trump – much like the English sneered at the Afrikaaner under apartheid while dining at the same table. But the precariat should be encouraged by the election of a US president who threatens to expose the insanity of the system, spread misery and insecurity to the better classes and unveil capitalism as a feast of vultures. There is no downside to confronting reality. Continue reading

South Africa: cautionary tale

Charges of fraud against South Africa’s finance minister, Pravin Gordhan, have been dropped. No disgrace attaches. It’s largely accepted he’s been framed for trying to expose a web of cronyism and graft spun from President Jacob Zuma’s office. Support for the minister’s efforts to ‘clean-up’ government is growing. But so too is the recognition that capitalism without corruption is fantasy. Continue reading

Little Israel

Jeremy Corbyn was re-elected leader of the Labour Party despite the efforts of his fellow MPs and a hostile media to bully him into submission. He has promised there will be no recriminations and called for party unity. His enemies  pretend to be mollified while getting a second wind and sharpening their daggers. Public life is cynical and seedy in Little Israel. Continue reading